Age of Legend

The Legends of the First Empire 04: Age of Legend

Rating: 4 out of 5.

After years of warfare, humanity has gained the upper hand and has pushed the Fhrey to the edge of their homeland, but no farther. Now comes the pivotal moment. Persephone’s plan to use the stalemate to seek peace is destroyed by an unexpected betrayal that threatens to hand victory to the Fhrey and leaves a dear friend in peril. Her only hope lies in the legend of a witch, a forgotten song, and a simple garden door.

Goodreads, Synopsis

Reviews of Previous Books in the Series

  1. Age of Myth
  2. Age of Swords
  3. Age of War

Review

**Recap alert—spoilers for previous books**

Age of War finished shortly after the battle in and around Alon Rhist. A battle the Fhrey were on the verge of annihilating the Rhunes, until Suri created a Dragon, by sacrificing another that she loved, Raithe, as she had with Minna. This, not long after losing her friend and teacher Arion in battle. How much more heartbreak and sacrifice can the young mystic endure before it destroys her?

During the Fhrey assault on Alon Rhist, Tesh took the opportunity to murder one of the Galantians, Sebek, their best warrior, albeit while he was severely injured—after fighting a Raow that was sent to kill Persephone—and unable to defend himself. Still, Tesh keeps his secret to himself, not even trusting Brin with it.

Persephone agreed to marry Nyphron to cement the alliance between the Galantians and Rhunes; her as Keenig and he as leader of the armies. All the while, Fane Lothian has returned to Estramnadon in defeat, and Imaly is potentially plotting something behind his back having received a letter from Persephone seeking peace.

Will Nyphron compromise and be willing to seek peace? Persephone is in the dark over his plans to rule as Fane. She doesn’t know it is he who started the war; he who slaughtered Rhune villages.

“We have but the roads that lie before our feet, and all too often our choices are limited to walking or standing still. And standing still gets us nowhere.”

Malcolm

Age of Legend feels somewhat slower than the previous books because the Rhune and Fhrey are effectively in a stalemate early on. There are skirmishes, and Tesh, along with his Techylors—Rhunes trained by him and under his command—is at the focal point of much of these. Will his secret be revealed and unravel as he must side-by-side with the Galantians?

As we know from Age of Swords, a Gilarabrywn (Dragon), has a limited range, and therefore the Dragon made sacrificing Raithe cannot aide the Rhunes in pushing further forward to break the stalemate, but it can protect the land they’ve already won. Will Suri be asked to create another? Will she be able to? Will it break her if she does? How much more can she endure?

Malcolm leaves, though nobody knows why or to where. He leaves Tressa with a key and cryptic message in the form of a song. Tressa, who is generally disliked among those originally from Dahl Rhen, steps forward as a character in this book. If you’ve read my past reviews for this series, you’ll know I think a lot of the characters, especially female characters, are great and well developed. In Age of Legend, I started to feel for Tressa’s plight, though she doesn’t make it easy!

The book also ends at a very interesting point, with a promise that we’ll get to explore new realms. This is another excellent instalment in the series and I’m very excited for the release of Age of Death.

We humans have one advantage: We’re more experienced at loss.

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